Tuesday, July 21, 2015

My Schedule for Scares That Cares This Weekend (July 24-26th) in Williamsbug, Virginia




My Schedule at Scares That Cares Weekend in Williamsburg, Virginia this weekend.  The horror convention for charity will be at the Doubletree Hotel at Williamsburg, 50 Kingsmill Road, Williamsburg, Virginia, 23185

I will be at the Horror Writers Association Virginia table in the vendor’s room from 5:00 to 10:00 p.m. Friday, July 24. I will have copies of my fiction and two of my nonfiction ghost books, Virginia's Haunted Historic Triangle: Williamsburg, Yorktown, Jamestown, and Other Haunted Locations (this one has Williamsburg and Colonial Williamsburg’s haunted spots, so you can investigate the areas yourself while at the convention) and Haunted Virginia: Legends, Myths and True Tales. I will have Paranormal World Seekers DVDs—Fort Magruder Hotel in Williamsburg ones and Crawford Road—all of the area. Not sure yet, but the table will be in either the main vendor room or in STC’s second floor vendor area. I will post on Facebook and twitter when I learn Friday. 


Friday, July 25— Rooms A/B—10:45am to 11:30am — I will join author Penny Cockrell in doing a reading. Thinking reading from my WSFA Small Press Awrd runner up short story, "Bottled Spirits." Maybe from Spectre Nightmares and Visitations if there is time.

Sunday, July 26— Rooms A/B—11:00am to 12:00pm – PANEL: “WRITER’S GROUPS IN A DIGITAL AGE” – There are many groups for horror writers (HWA, ITW, SFWA, etc.) but do they offer anything that can’t be obtained on social media for free? Join TIM WAGGONER, RONALD MALFI, JACOB HADDON, PAMELA K. KINNEY, D. ALEXANDER WARD, and moderator DELONA SOUTHERLAND as they discuss and debate.


For the rest of the author programming: http://scaresthatcareweekend.com/events/author-programming-schedule/

For all the events at Scares That Cares: http://scaresthatcareweekend.com/events/

Friday, July 17, 2015

Supernatural Friday: Of Course I Live in a Haunted House: Guest Blogger Loren Rhoads





Today, I have a guest blogger, Loren Rhoads. She will tells us all about a true paranormal incident she had. After you read the story, check out her book, The Dangerous Type.


I live in a big old house four doors down from an enormous mortuary that’s been in operation since 1888.  When my husband and I first moved in, weird things happened:  the power surged at odd moments, dimming the lights to a murky brown or making them blaze white-hot; books cascaded off the shelves when no one was in the room; the TV switched itself on and off, talking to itself behind my back.

Since its construction in 1940, our house had only been owned by a single Italian family.  The elderly widow lived alone in it for 20 years after her husband died.  When she finally passed, the house went to her grandson, a flight attendant who didn’t want to live so far from the active center of town.  We thought we got a reasonably good deal on it because we bought it in December.

After we moved in, my husband traveled quite a bit with his band.  Generally I don’t mind being home alone, but the way things kept happening in the corner of my eye or in the next room before I entered made me jumpy.  I would lie awake in the middle of the night, listening to the floorboards creak as if someone paced from the living room to the bathroom and back.

One evening I was settling down in the spare bedroom to watch a movie when the basement door opened on its own.

I’d had enough.  “Hi,” I said aloud.  My voice shook just a little.  My heart beat hard and fast.  “I’m about to sit down to watch The Wizard of Oz.  Would you care to join me?”

I waited for a response, but didn’t hear one.  I shifted over on the sofa to leave room for the ghost.  I didn’t want to touch her.  I’d assumed all along that I was dealing with the ghost of the previous owner, not someone (or several someones) who had wandered over from the mortuary down the street.  If it was only one ghost, I could deal with it.  If we were going to face a continual string of hauntings as people couldn’t move on, I would have a much more difficult time adjusting.

“I don’t mind if you stay in the house with us,” I told the empty room.  “You lived here a long time and must have happy memories here.  In fact, I would like it if you could stay and watch over the baby we hope to have someday soon.  But I ask that you stop trying to scare me.  Don’t sneak up behind me or drop things or open doors, unless you absolutely must.  Don’t make the lights flicker. We all live here now. It would be best for us all to get along.  If you can’t abide by that, I have a friend who can cast you out.”

I pressed the button on the remote and settled in to watch The Wizard of Oz.  I felt much more relaxed than I had in days.

The power still goes out every couple of months, but now the whole block goes with us and we blame PG&E.  The doors stopped opening on their own once we brought the baby home from the hospital.  I’m up quite a lot in the night, but I haven’t run into the ghost.  I like to think that she’s still here, serving as a guardian angel for my daughter.  I wonder if all she wanted was a baby to love.

Loren Rhoads

                                                              ***

The Dangerous Type  Book blurb:
The Dangerous Type has been called La Femme Nikita meets Serenity. Former Imperial assassin Raena Zacari has been released from prison and she’s ready to track down the man who trained her to kill. Humans are a minority in a dangerous galaxy peopled by tomb robbers, gun runners, and media pirates. Publishers Weekly accused author Loren Rhoads of bringing grimdark to space opera. Kill By Numbers and No More Heroes, the other two books in the trilogy, will be out from Night Shade before the end of 2015.



About Loren Rhoads:
Loren Rhoads is the author of The Dangerous Type, Kill By Numbers, and No More Heroes. The In the Wake of the Templars trilogy will be published by Night Shade Books in 2015. She is also editor of The Haunted Mansion Project: Year Two and author of a collection of essays called Wish You Were Here: Adventures in Cemetery Travel. Learn more at www.lorenrhoads.com.


Links:


Loren on Facebook: www.facebook.com/loren.rhoads.5
Loren on Twitter: http://twitter.com/morbidloren

Loren’s blog: http://lorenrhoads.com/blog


Buy Links:

Sunday, July 12, 2015

Supernatural Friday: Seventeen Haunted Restaurants in America





 Being this is summer and many people take vacations, I will blog about 17 haunted restaurants and bars that maybe on one of your trips you can stop by for a bite to eat and maybe even a bit of paranormal activity. I am sure there is pleny more out there, but this is some to begin with. 



 http://www.tofugu.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/handsomepantsghosts.jpg


      1. The Bistro at Market and Grove, Petersburg, Virginia. A restaurant  in Old Town Petersburg where good food can be found, it is also haunted. A female spirit has been seen and even photographed dancing in the dining room. A male spirit has been heard cussing and anther female spirit of a friend of the owner still hangs around—seen, heard, and even odor from marijuana smelled she used to like to smoke in life.  Paranormal investigators have investigated it, even filmed and investigated for episode on DVD for Paranormal World Seekers. It will be a chapter in an upcoming ghost book too.    https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Bistro-at-Market-and-Grove/99642348471

          2, Poogan’s Porch, Charleston, South Carolina. Charleston police have received so many calls about a distressed woman dressed in black trapped inside this upscale Southern restaurant that authorities disregard new reports. Zoe St. Amand, a spinster schoolteacher, is who supposedly haunts the building. She owned the house in the early 1900s and went mad after the death of her sister, her only friend. Legend has it that Zoe fell down the stairs to her death while fruitlessly searching for her sister one night. She likes to move place settings around the tables and mess with food orders. She also hurls bar stools at the staff and throws open doors when she's upset. The restaurant's namesake was a Wheaton Terrier named Poogan who died in 1979. It is also said that the dog still runs through the dining room, claims made by children. who say they feel Poogan running under the table. poogansporch.com

          3. Old Town Pizza, Portland Oregon. Old Town Pizza was founded in 1974 when the Accuardi family opened the doors of a legendary Portland landmark, the Merchant Hotel, the spot Old Town Pizza now stands atop the city's infamous Shanghai Tunnels. The lobby of the Merchant Hotel was transformed into the hippest pizza joint in town. Generations of Old Town Pizza loyalists remember the restaurant as a bustling hang-out for leaders in Portland’s counterculture scene of the 70s. Actor Willem Dafoe was a regular at the time and could usually be found lounging on a couch on the mezzanine. Today the Milne family keeps the Old Town Pizza legacy alive, nurturing a little piece of Portland’s past for the next generation. On the haunting front, legend tells of one of the young “working women” sold into a thriving white slavery market and in an effort to clean up the neighborhood, traveling missionaries convinced her to share information in exchange for freeing her from a fate she did not choose. Nina cooperated but soon afterward was found dead in the Merchant Hotel. That woman was Naina and she has hung around the place for a century. She supposedly scratched her name into a brick on that elevator shaft, which is now part of a booth. Nina is often seen in a black dress observing diners and wandering the basement below. Any faint perfume smelled or a presence felt behind, but when you turned to see and no one is there, you've just met Nina. http://www.oldtownpizza.com/

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      4. Muriel’s, New Orleans, Louisiana. In a city like NOLA, haunted    
buildings are a dime-a-dozen. And while Muriel's doesn't boast the most      horrific backstory, it's seen some dark deeds. In the late 1700s, Pierre Antoine Lepardi Jourdan bought the burned-out mansion and restored it to its old charms. Then, in a classic future-ghost move, he bet the entire house in a poker game, which he lost. Because he couldn't bear to leave the place, he killed himself on the second floor, right around where the Seance Lounges stand today. Jourdan spends most of his time there -- he pops up as a shimmery light rather than a complete ghostly form, but he still knocks on the brick wall with the gusto of a full-fledged apparition. And he's got company. Paranormal investigators picked up the voice of a woman in the Seance Lounges, and there's definitely another poltergeist in the Courtyard Bar who's big on smashing glasses. There is one unavailable table at this Jackson Square restaurant. It's freshly set every night with bread and wine for a previous owner of the property, Pierre Antoine Lepardi Jourdan, whose ghost has a standing reservation. Gambling ruined Jourdan in 1814, when he lost his house in a poker game. Inconsolable at having to vacate, he committed suicide on the second floor. The appropriately named Séance Lounges upstairs are where Mr. Jourdan is said to spend most of his time knocking on walls, but the staff claim that glasses have flown from behind the bar and shattered against the far brick wall three times since 2001. muriels.com


         5. Brennan’s Restaurant, New Orleans, Louisiana. Chef Paul Blangé created many of this restaurant's iconic dishes, like bananas Foster flambéed tableside, and staff says he never leaves the kitchen—even though Blangé died in 1977. The chef was so dedicated that he was buried with the restaurant's menu and a knife and fork across his chest, and he is said to mark the end of a night's shift by banging pots and pans as the restaurant's doors are locked. In the wine cellar, the ghost of sommelier Herman Funk—who helped build the restaurant's legendary collection of wine and spirits—now signals his selections to servers by clinking bottles. brennansneworleans.com

      6. Wabi Sabi, Petersburg, Virginia.  Located in Old Town Petersburg on the first floor of the former National Friend house. They serve food, particularly sushi, there is two bars, have live music and art gallery.  The place also has ghosts. From a black Confederate soldier to maybe a former lady of the evening that might still be plying her ample charms (the building also was rumored to be a brothel at one point), and even the ghost of a little boy, the living are not the only beings in the place.  http://www.eatwabisabi.com/

      7. Crab Louie’s, Midlothian, Virginia. Once called Midlothian and owned by a family named Wooldridge, the place changed hands and names over the years. It was once a stop for the Lynchburg-Richmond stage, and it's also been a boarding school, a nursery and finally a restaurant. Notice of the ghostly phenomena started in the 1980s and continues to this very day. The main ghosts are a man dressed in clothing from the 19th century and a little girl, though one past owner thought it might be several that haunted the place. But it is "Rachel," the little girl ghost, that most of the phenomena is attributed to. This includes glasses coming off bar racks (many times flying), plates disappearing and apparitions of the little girl near table 10. Children have also been heard singing around table 10, and a calculator once turned itself on. Next time you go to Crab Louie's, ask for table 10 - if you dare. http://crablouies.com/

         8. White Horse Tavern, Newport, Rhode Island. Considered America’s oldest tavern, it opened in 1673. The White Horse was a regular haunt for Colonists, British soldiers, Hessian mercenaries, pirates, sailors, founding fathers and all manner of early American folk. By 1954, the structure showed years of use and neglect. Through the generosity of the Van Beuren family the property was acquired by The Preservation Society of Newport County and meticulously restored. It re-opened as The White Horse Tavern in 1957. O.L. Pitts of Fort Worth, Texas, along with three partners, purchased the White Horse Tavern in 1981. Infamous participants in the revelry of the America’s Cup races, they continued the tradition of good fellowship, good food and good cheer. On his ninetieth birthday, O.L. Pitts turned stewardship of the Tavern over to Paul Hogan, a Newport native and only the sixth owner in three hundred and fifty years. The story behind the hauntings was that two men showed up at the tavern in the 1720s looking for a room for the night. The next day, the owners found one dead by the fireplace and the other completely vanished. A specter now chills by the fireplace, daring people to solve his freak death. There have also been encounters with a colonial-looking dude in the upstairs bathroom, and mysterious footsteps all over the place. Coincidentally, there's another White Horse Tavern in New York City with high ghost-hunter interest. It's where poet Dylan Thomas drank himself to death, and he still hasn't learned his lesson, as he occasionally pops up at his regular table.  http://www.whitehorsenewport.com/

      9. Casey Moore’s Oyster House, Tempre, Arizona. Casey Moore's has several different stories on the poltergeists that spook the grounds. One account goes that a coed named Sarah, who was strangled by her crazy boyfriend on-site, sulks around the dining room tables. Another says the spirit of a little boy, whose photograph was unearthed years ago amid renovations -- prowls the halls. Either way -- you might actually have to believe your buddy when he insists half your shrimp cocktail "just disappeared" when you went to the bathroom. http://www.caseymoores.com/Home.html

     10. Stone’s Public House, Ashland, Massachusetts. John Stone, the original owner of this inn-turned-gastropub, had a secret. A psychic who visited in 1984 claims resident spirits told him that in 1845, Mr. Stone killed a New York boarder named Michael during a fight, after Stone accused the man of cheating in a card game in which Michael won $3,000. Witnesses to the crime aided Stone in burying the body. Now the staff dreads Stone and other spirits placing ghostly hands on customers' necks and throwing glasses from the shelves. www.stonespublichouse.com

          11 Catfish Plantation, Waxahachie, Texas. Known as "the most haunted    
          restaurant in Texas," this Cajun restaurant occupies a Victorian house and
         boasts the presence of multiple specters. Caroline, a former resident who 
        died in 1970, seems to be under the impression that she still runs the kitchen. 
       The restaurant's owners in the 1980s, Tom and Melissa Baker, reported 
       finding a pot of coffee brewing one morning and teacups stacked in the 
       middle of the floor another morning—though no one else had keys to the 
       restaurant. Since then, others have witnessed the apparition of a bride 
        standing by the window. catfishplantation.com

12. Beardslee Castle, Little Falls, New York . This restaurant is in a faux Irish castle in the Mohawk Valley. It was in an episode of Ghost Hunters. There are tales of ghosts shattering glasses, moving objects and closing doors. In 1983, Norm Gauthier, a ghost hunter from the New Hampshire Institute for Paranormal Research, surveyed the property and concluded that there were definitely two spirits present in the castle. While one legend says that Native Americans were killed on the property in the 1700s, the ghosts in residence are believed to be younger: Anton "Pop"; Christensen, the former owner who hung himself in the ladies' room in the 1950s to put an end to his failing health; and a bride-to-be named Abigail who died the night before her wedding. (Weddings are still held on the property.) In 1989, a fire broke out in the castle and destroyed the kitchens without harming the original structure. Some believe that this was the ghosts' way of rebelling against all the attention. Not all of the ghosts' activity is destructive; some say they also reset tables. beardsleecastle.com



  13. Patrick’s Roadhouse, Santa Monica, California. Known for celebrity sightings, overstuffed omelets and a funky, shamrock-adorned exterior, this narrow roadhouse has ghosts from the building's former incarnations as a motel, hot dog stand, brothel and trolley station. But the most vibrant ghoul is the Roadhouse's last owner, Bill Fischler, who was known to publicly ridicule customers who complained about food. He occasionally pops in to check on his restaurant and its employees. One chef even quit after seeing Fischler's ghost appear at the back of the restaurant, glaring at him with dissatisfaction. patricksroadhouse.info


14. Blue Willow Tea Room, Petersburg, Virginia. Located in Historic Old Towne Petersburg and situated adjacent to Penniston's Alley Antiques and Collectibles, you can enjoy a spot of tea", as you sit "amongst the antiques" in this c.1815 Federal townhouse. They offer a traditional English tea service consisting of a cream tea, luncheon tea, Victorian tea or full afternoon tea.  They also have homemade desserts, soups and salads. Though it is mainly the second and third floors above the tea room and Penniston’s next door that has the bulk of the hauntings, whose to say that the spirits might not come downstairs to check out the people. While it is thought that the first mayor of Petersburg stalks the second floor, the third floor is haunted by slaves fleeing slavery by the Underground Railroad, though obviously, they never left the place. At one point, the ghostly slaves frightened off some ghost hunters one night.  http://www.bluewillowtearoom.com/

 15. Manhattan Bistro, New York City, New York. On December 22, 1799, when Soho was still a sloping meadow, Julia Elmore Sands was murdered by her fiancé and thrown into the Manhattan Well at 129 Spring Street. Marks on her neck suggested she had been strangled. Handbills distributed to the public implied that Weeks had impregnated Sands before killing her, and the woman's family later displayed her corpse outside their boarding house to encourage speculation. Weeks was arrested and tried for murder on March 31, 1800. It was the first murder trial in American history to be fully documented by a court stenographer. He was found innocent, thanks to his lawyers (who happened to include future dueling opponents Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton). Weeks fled the city due to pinlic outrage. Many years later, the well still exists in the basement of the now-shuttered Manhattan Bistro. History buffs are always eager to view the basement. Former owner Martia DaGrossa who had run the restaurant in the Spring Street building her family has owned since 1954 recalls two incidents when bottles of red wine flew off the wall and crashed onto the floor. The Travel Channel has named it one of the 10 most haunted places in America.

16. Succotash, Kansas City, Missouri. Before being rechristened as local brunch favorite, this 100-year-old saloon was the Dutch Hill Bar & Grill. One of its old regulars still haunts the bar. Succotash owner Beth Barden first encountered the visitor while renovating the abandoned restaurant. "We would smell cigars," Barden recalls. "I spoke to one of the old neighbors and some of the old staff, who said there was a gentleman named Radar who was there all the time. He used to sit at the end of the bar and smoke these cigarillos." To this day, after closing up the restaurant, the staff will smell the distinct musk of a cigar. "I guess this was his home away from home," Barden says, "He was a barfly who spent many, many days here, and when he died, he just stayed." succotashkc.com

17.  Ruth's Chris Steak House, Richmond, Virginia. Another restaurant with spirits beyond the alcoholic kind is Ruth's Chris Steak House at Bellgrade Plantation. The story behind the haunting has all the makings of an Edgar Allen Poe tale. In 1840, the Friend family sold the plantation to an older Frenchman named RBeardslee Castle, Little Falls, New York. This restaurant is in a faux Irish castle in the Mohawk Valley. It was in an episode of Ghost Hunters. There are tales of ghosts shattering glasses, moving objects and closing doors. In 1983, Norm Gauthier, a ghost hunter from the New Hampshire Institute for Paranormal Research, surveyed the property and concluded that there were definitely two spirits present in the castle. While one legend says that Native Americans were killed on the property in the 1700s, the ghosts in residence are believed to be younger: Anton "Pop"; Christensen, the former owner who hung himself in the ladies' room in the 1950s to put an end to his failing health; and a bride-to-be named Abigail who died the night before her wedding. (Weddings are still held on the property.) In 1989, a fire broke out in the castle and destroyed the kitchens without harming the original structure. Some believe that this was the ghosts' way of rebelling against all the attention. Not all of the ghosts' activity is destructive; some say they also reset tables. beardsleecastle.com




18.  Patrick’s Roadhouse, Santa Monica, California.  Known for celebrity sightings, overstuffed omelets and a funky, shamrock-adorned exterior, this narrow roadhouse has ghosts from the building's former incarnations as a motel, hot dog stand, brothel and trolley station. But the most vibrant ghoul is the Roadhouse's last owner, Bill Fischler, who was known to publicly ridicule customers who complained about food. He occasionally pops in to check on his restaurant and its employees. One chef even quit after seeing Fischler's ghost appear in the back of the restaurant, glaring at him with dissatisfaction. patricksroadhouse.info


Blue Willow Tea Room, Petersburg, Virginia. Located in Historic Old Towne Petersburg and situated adjacent to Penniston's Alley Antiques and Collectibles, you can enjoy a spot of tea", as you sit "amongst the antiques" in this c.1815 Federal townhouse. They offer a traditional English tea service consisting of a cream tea, luncheon tea, Victorian tea or full afternoon tea.  They also have homemade desserts, soups and salads. Though it is mainly the second and third floors above the tea room and Penniston’s next door that has the bulk of the hauntings, whose to say that the spirits might not come downstairs to check out the people. While it is thought that the first mayor of Petersburg stalks the second floor, the third floor is haunted by slaves fleeing slavery by the Underground Railroad, though obviously, they never left the place. At one point, the ghostly slaves frightened off some ghost hunters one night.  http://www.bluewillowtearoom.com/

 Manhattan Bistro, New York City, New York. On December 22, 1799, when Soho was still a sloping meadow, Julia Elmore Sands was murdered by her fiancé and thrown into the Manhattan Well at 129 Spring Street. Marks on her neck suggested she had been strangled. Handbills distributed to the public implied that Weeks had impregnated Sands before killing her, and the woman's family later displayed her corpse outside their boarding house to encourage speculation. Weeks was arrested and tried for murder on March 31, 1800. It was the first murder trial in American history to be fully documented by a court stenographer. He was found innocent, thanks to his lawyers (who happened to include future dueling opponents Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton). Weeks fled the city due to pinlic outrage. Many years later, the well still exists in the basement of the now-shuttered Manhattan Bistro. History buffs are always eager to view the basement. Former owner Martia DaGrossa who had run the restaurant in the Spring Street building her family has owned since 1954 recalls two incidents when bottles of red wine flew off the wall and crashed onto the floor. The Travel Channel has named it one of the 10 most haunted places in America.
19. Succotash, Kansas City, Missouri. Before being rechristened as local brunch favorite, this 100-year-old saloon was the Dutch Hill Bar & Grill. One of its old regulars still haunts the bar. Succotash owner Beth Barden first encountered the visitor while renovating the abandoned restaurant. "We would smell cigars," Barden recalls. "I spoke to one of the old neighbors and some of the old staff, who said there was a gentleman named Radar who was there all the time. He used to sit at the end of the bar and smoke these cigarillos." To this day, after closing up the restaurant, the staff will smell the distinct musk of a cigar. "I guess this was his home away from home," Barden says, "He was a barfly who spent many, many days here, and when he died, he just stayed." succotashkc.com

20. Ruth's Chris Steak House, Richmond, Virginia. Another restaurant with spirits beyond the alcoholic kind is Ruth's Chris Steak House at Bellgrade Plantation. The story behind the haunting has all the makings of an Edgar Allen Poe tale. In 1840, the Friend family sold the plantation to an older Frenchman named Robiou. He met and became enamored with the 14-year-old daughter of a neighbor, Wormley, and was granted her hand in marriage. One day, he returned home and found her with a former boyfriend, Reid. He demanded a divorce, which didn't sit well with the father. The father convinced his daughter's lover to help him retaliate against Robiou. What happened next was horrible. Wormley shot Robiou, and both he and Reid were arrested. Reid got off - as it was said he had been coerced into the plot - but not Wormley. Eventually, he was hung at the county courthouse. Within two weeks of her father's hanging, Robiou's widow fell down the front stairs of the plantation house and died. Since that time, both she and her murdered husband's spirits have been seen, mainly in the boxwood gardens behind the place. And sometimes, inside the building, too.
During the Civil War, Bellgrade was used by General A.P. Hill as his headquarters while engaged in a campaign located between Richmond and Petersburg. It was also utilized as a hospital for southern soldiers. General Hill was killed during this campaign. There was an attempt to take his body to Hollywood Cemetery, but there was no way to get it across the James River because of bridge damage and Union troops. Hill’s body was then taken to Bellgrade and buried in the Friend family cemetery. In his last will and testament, he had requested to be buried standing up at Bellgrade. After the war had ended, his body was moved to Hollywood Cemetery and buried standing up. When the statue in his honor was created, his body was supposedly moved for the last time. But later, an administrator at Hollywood revealed the statue, his body, and coffin were removed to another location, at the intersection of Hermitage and Laburnum,  and again he was buried standing up. http://www.sizzlingsteak.com/ruths-chris-richmond


obiou. He met and became enamored with the 14-year-old daughter of a neighbor, Wormley, and was granted her hand in marriage. One day, he returned home and found her with a former boyfriend, Reid. He demanded a divorce, which didn't sit well with the father. The father convinced his daughter's lover to help him retaliate against Robiou. What happened next was horrible. Wormley shot Robiou, and both he and Reid were arrested. Reid got off - as it was said he had been coerced into the plot - but not Wormley. Eventually, he was hung at the county courthouse. Within two weeks of her father's hanging, Robiou's widow fell down the front stairs of the plantation house and died. Since that time, both she and her murdered husband's spirits have been seen, mainly in the boxwood gardens behind the place. And sometimes, inside the building, too.
During the Civil War, Bellgrade was used by General A.P. Hill as his headquarters while engaged in a campaign located between Richmond and Petersburg. It was also utilized as a hospital for southern soldiers. General Hill was killed during this campaign. There was an attempt to take his body to Hollywood Cemetery, but there was no way to get it across the James River because of bridge damage and Union troops. Hill’s body was then taken to Bellgrade and buried in the Friend family cemetery. In his last will and testament, he had requested to be buried standing up at Bellgrade. After the war had ended, his body was moved to Hollywood Cemetery and buried standing up. When the statue in his honor was created, his body was supposedly moved for the last time. But later, an administrator at Hollywood revealed the statue, his body, and coffin were removed to another location, at the intersection of Hermitage and Laburnum,  and again he was buried standing up. http://www.sizzlingsteak.com/ruths-chris-richmond

Next time you decide to eat at a haunted eatery and feel someone watching you eat, it’s not the waiter or waitress. It just might be the ghost that must now live vicariously through the living as they can no longer eat or drink. Happy haunting...I meant, happy eating......


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Friday, July 03, 2015

Supernatural Friday: Fourth of July Myths




Tomorrow is the Fourth of July for the United States. It is a celebration of the winning of our independence back in the 18th century.



There are myths connected with the Fourth. It's something different to learn about this holiday, showing that we Americans have much to learn about our history.

 
The 4th of July is a celebration of the U.S. Constitution.  
The U.S. Constitution’s purpose was to remake the American governments of the Revolution by making the system less democratic. The delegates from 12 states who met in Philadelphia in summer 1787 had been sent by the states to recommend amendments to the Articles of Confederation. Instead, they instantly decided to meet in secret, and then the nationalists among them tried to win adoption of a national – rather than a federal – constitution.

The 4th of July was the day that the 13 states established their independence.
No, it was not. Virginia established its independence on May 15, 1776, when its revolutionary Convention adopted resolutions for a declaration of rights, a permanent republican constitution, and federal and treaty relationships with other states and foreign countries. It was because the Old Dominion had already established its independence – had, in fact, already sworn in the first governor under its permanent republican constitution of 1776, Patrick Henry, on June 29 – that Virginia’s congressmen, uniquely, had been given categorical instructions from their state legislature to declare independence. Virginia was not the only state whose independence was not established by the Declaration on the 4th, as New York’s congressional delegation did not then join in the Declaration. In short, the states became independent in their own good time – some on July 4, some before it, some after the date.

The chief legacy of the 4th of July is the political philosophy set out in the Declaration of Independence.
Since the 18th century, political radicals have argued for understanding the Declaration as a general warrant for government to do anything it likes to forward the idea that "all men are created equal." Yet, that was not what the Declaration of Independence meant. The Declaration of Independence was the work of a congress of representatives of state governments. Congressmen were not elected by voters at large, but by state legislatures, and their role (as John Adams, one of them, put it) was more akin to that of ambassadors than to legislators. They had not been empowered to dedicate society to any particular political philosophy, but to declare – as the Virginia legislature had told its congressmen to declare – that the colonies were, "and of right ought to be, free and independent states." In other words, the Declaration was about states’ rights, not individual rights, and the Congress that adopted it had no power to make it anything else. All the rest of the Declaration was mere rhetorical predicate.

The 4th of July is a non-partisan holiday dedicated to recalling the legacy of the American Revolution.
In the Founders’ day, the 4th of July was a partisan holiday. Celebrated in the 1790s and 1800s by Jeffersonian Republicans to show their devotion to Jeffersonian, rather than Hamiltonian, political philosophy. If a Federalist in the 1790s, you would celebrate Washington’s Birthday instead of the 4th of July. If you believed in the inherent power of the Executive in formulating foreign policy, in the power of Congress to charter a bank despite the absence of express constitutional authorization to do so, and in the power of the federal government to punish people who criticized the president or Congress, you would not celebrate the 4th. The 4th was the holiday of the Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions of 1798, those great states’-rights blasts at federal lawlessness. It was the anti-Hamilton, anti-Washington, anti-nationalist holiday.

The fulfillment of the 4th of July lay in the establishment of a powerful national government.
Celebrants of the 4th of July in the Founders’ time rejected the idea that the Constitution had created a national government. They insisted that it was federal instead and that Congress had only the powers it had been expressly delegated. This was chiefly through Article I, Section 8, that the federal courts had no more jurisdiction than they had been assigned through Article III, and that the vast majority of government functions had been kept by the states. When federal courts grabbed for more power in 1793, these people added the Eleventh Amendment to the Constitution. In response to the nationalists’ war on France and Alien and Sedition Acts, they first adopted the Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions of 1798, then elected Republicans – Jeffersonian states’-rights/laissez-faire advocates – to run their government.

The Declaration of Independence stood for the rights of white, male property owners alone.
The philosophical material in the first section of the Declaration, although commonplace at the time, had no legal or moral weight. Congress didn't have power to commit the states to it. Now, revolutionaries who accepted the Lockean version of social compact theory did not necessarily believe that only white, male property holders had rights. Thomas Jefferson, for example, who was the author of the draft Lockean section of the Declaration, followed his belief in the idea that all men equally had a right to self-government, coupled with his belief that white and black people could never live together peacefully as equal citizens in America, to the conclusion that blacks must be colonized abroad to someplace where they might exercise their right to self-government.

The fulfillment of the 4th of July will come when the United States has sponsored democratic revolutions throughout the world.
No. George Washington--in an address he co-wrote with Alexander Hamilton and John Jay-- along with Thomas Jefferson counseled that the U.S. avoid foreign entanglements, and of course, foreign wars.

 

Friday, June 26, 2015

Supernatural Friday: Can Weather and Other Things Affect the Paranormal?



 http://www.westsydneyparanormal.org/uploads/3/9/0/3/3903302/163568.png?363

With some much I had to do today and the person for my interview couldn’t do it, I am posting this post from August 2011. Appropriate after all the bad thunderstorms we went through here in Virginia past couple of days.
My adult son told me he heard a loud bang last night from the office as we slept and he ran into there, only to find nothing undisturbed. When I said it might be from an aftershock from the earthquake that hit Virginia, he said only heard the bang from one wall and nothing shook. I thought that maybe it was a ghostly presence? And wondered if spirits are affected by disturbances like quakes, hurricanes, and more, like it is said thunderstorms can cause things to do with the paranormal.

As the living here scramble to prepare for Hurricane Irene, do ghosts react negatively or positively to this threat too? Did the quake and its aftershocks make more paranormal activity along the East Coast than normal?

At http://www.examiner.com/christian-living-in-raleigh/is-the-world-ending-part-1-earthquakes-hurricanes-tornadoes-wars-debts they talk about how this might suggest the end of the world as prophesized. But my concern is more in how the atmosphere from first the quake and now the hurricane might make phantoms appeared more often than the norm.

I do know that there are spirits who forewarn those of approaching storms, like the Gray Man of Pawley Island, South Carolina. He always appears just before a storm hits the island, warning the inhabitants. When the "Storm of 1822" slammed the area, most perished, except one young girl and her family. According to legends, she was warned by the phantom of her departed lover. A man in 1954 was also warned by a stranger to take his family and flee. The man returned after the storm left the area only to find most of the island in shambles, except for his house. Even the wash was still left on the line! That is another facet of the legend, that those who see the Grey Man means that no harm will come to them.

Another is the "Gray Man" of Hatteras, North Corolina. Legends says that the ghost is of a sailor named Gray, who perished on his ship when it was caught in a hurricane. He hangs close to the lighthouse, warning those of the approaching storms. Those who do not heed his warning are doomed to die when the hurricane hits Hatteras.

So when Irene leaves the East Coast, take notice of anything strange. Do you hear voices when no one is there or suddenly, do things on your shelves fly off ? It would be interesting to check out. And if you see the Gray man, listen to him.

Friday, June 19, 2015

Supernatural Friday: Haunting Summer Solstice Battle






With summer solstice in a couple if days, do ghosts wait for the dark of night, no matter how late? Or do they appear as usual? This original poem I wrote (please share the blog link and not the poem-copyrighted) is about one Civil War battlefield's nightly haunt on the upcoming solstice.


Haunting Summer Solstice Battle
By
Pamela K. Kinney


Only 19% visible;
the solstice moon
looks down
on the battlefield.
Silence,
except for crickets
in the humid night.
From both sides
comes pale, wisps of
shades on horseback
and many on foot.
Noise of battle erupting.
Out of sync,
no reality
Blue against gray,
Union against Confederate,
cannon fire and guns blasting.
Their ectoplasmic war began late,
All due to the
longest day
of the year
Dawn,
the cock crows
and phantoms
vanish with the sun.
Until the next night…

http://www.hauntedhovel.com/images/antietambattlefield.jpg

 

Friday, June 12, 2015

Supernatural Friday: Truth on the Living Dead

 

I want to set some records straight, as I noticed more and more people consider zombies to be flesh eaters, thanks to "Night of the Living Dead," and zombie horror flicks after that. In reality all undead is living dead. 

This goes back to Gilgamesh and maybe even back to caveman times. Vampires in Eastern Europe did not begin just drinking blood, but flesh too. They were also mindless like zombies, coming from their graves to attack their relatives, not everybody. Later this changed to any person could be a victim of the vampire.  Watching an episode of  "Game of Thrones," they had white walkers, but they di not bit or eat the living to change them. Those people died. It took the head walker with a crown on its head and do something--obviously magic--for the new dead to arise. So not all dead eat flesh, but all dead that rise from death are the living dead, or undead.

http://digital-art-gallery.com/oid/10/640x912_3296_Undead_2d_fantasy_guild_wars_undead_picture_image_digital_art.jpg
Zombie was a term a reporter called the ghouls of Night of the Living Dead. Romero thought of them as ghouls, not zombies. A zombie is supposed to be the living dead: people who die and are resurrected, but without their souls. According to legend, a zombi is someone who has annoyed his or her family and community to the degree that they can no longer stand to live with this person. They respond by hiring a Bokor who turns that person into a zombie. They can take orders, and they're supposed to never be tired, and to do what the master says.
Zombies are the product of spells by a voodoo sorcerer called a bokor. The word is believed to be of West African origin and was brought to Haiti by slaves from that region. Slavery was hard and cruel and it coud even be thought that maybe zombies was developed to keep a slave from killing themselves to escape slavery.  To become a zombie was the slave's worst nightmare: to be dead and still a slave, an eternal field hand. There are several ways to destroy zombies in fiction or movies and TV shows (decapitations or gunshots to the head are popular), though according to Haitian folklore the goal is to release the person from his or her zombie state, not to outright kill the person. There are several ways to free a zombie; feed the zombie salt; others say that if a zombie sees the ocean its mind will return and it will become self-aware and angry, trying to return to its grave.
The word "zombi" —spelled for years without the "e"— first appeared in print in an American newspaper in a reprinted short story called "The Unknown Painter" in 1838.  Then William Seabrook wrote about seeing "voodoo" cults in Haiti and the concept of the zombi to many readers. Several film scholars believe the book was the basis of the classic 1932 horror film White Zombie. The most famous studies of Haitian zombies was ethnobotanist Wade Davis' 1985 book The Serpent and the Rainbow: A Harvard Scientist's Astonishing Journey into the Secret Societies of Haitian Voodoo, Zombies, and Magic. Wade studied the case of Clairvius Narcisse, a man believed to have been turned into an actual zombie through a combination of drugs (including puffer fish venom and toad venom) in order to mimic death. Then they gave him the hallucinogenic drug tetrodotoxin to keep him in a zombie-like state.

So zombie does not mean the undead person is a flesh eater. Let's call the undead what it is-undead, living dead, walking dead. Because that is what they all are.
 http://michaelmay.us/12blog/09/0919-whitezombie.jpg